A MANUAL OF MILITARY SURGERY (1861) BY J. JULIAN CHISOLM, CSA (EXTREMELY RARE), REGULATIONS OF THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES, (1861)

Civil War Medical Books

While the cover of this book does not look glamorous, let me assure you this is an extremely rare and expensive book. It was made by the CSA and I note that the few books made by the COnfedearate States of America were poorly made, their bindings weak, their paper thin. For these reasons–not to mention only a handful were every published by the Southern Army aka CSA, these books are rare and therefore, highly desirable. The condition of this book I would say if good, it has had the binding repaired and certainly not a “hack” job.

Author: Chisolm, J. Julian (John Julian), 1830-1903.

A manual of military surgery, for the use of surgeons in the Confederate States army; with an appendix of the rules and regulations of the Medical department of the Confederate States army. Confederate States of America. War Dept. Published: Richmond, Va., West & Johnson, 1861. Edition: 1ST ed. 446 pages. Plus an appendix which contains the Regulations for the Medical Department of the Confederate States. For a total number of pages: 514. Field size: 7 1/2 x 5 1/4 x 1 1/4 in.

Julian Chisolm (1830-1903) was the foremost surgeon in the Confederacy. His important military surgery manual went through three editions and is regarded as one of the most famous artifacts in the history of Civil War medicine. At the outbreak of the Civil War he received the first Confederate military commission issued to a medical officer and attended the wounded at Fort Sumter. His Manual was presented to the Confederate Surgeon-General, Samuel Preston Moore, while the Battle of Bull Run was being fought.

John Julian Chisolm (1830 – 1903), surgeon and oculist, was born in Charleston, SC the son of Robert Trail and Harriet Emily Chisolm. He received his medical degree from the Medical College of South Carolina (1850) and continued his studies in London, Milan and Paris (1859). During the Crimean War Chisolm studied treatment techniques in European military hospitals.

At the outbreak of the Civil War he received the first Confederate Military Commission issued to a medical officer and attended the wounded at Fort Sumter. His Manual of Military Surgery (1861) was presented to the surgeon-general while the Battle of Bull Run was fought. Chisolm’s manual is regarded as one of the most famous artifacts in the History of Civil War Medicine.

John Julian Chisolm holds the distinction of having made the most important decision in the life of the most famous eye and ear patient who ever lived. In 1886, Helen Keller’s father brought her, a mute six-year old, deaf and blind since birth, to Dr. Chisolm. He confirmed for the last time that she would never see nor hear, but he was convinced that she could be educated. An extraordinary thought for the time, it required extraordinary efforts by extraordinary people. Chisolm referred Captain Keller to Alexander Graham Bell, who secured the teaching services of Annie Sullivan. The results were important to both our social history and our drama.